CONTENTS
     INTESTINAL DIALYSIS INTRODUCTION (This Page)
     INTESTINAL DIALYSIS THEORY (Page 2)
     INTESTINAL DIALYSIS CASE STUDY (Page 3)
     INTESTINAL DIALYSIS PROCEDURE (Page 4)
     ARIZONA RAILWAY MUSEUM
     OREGON LIGHTHOUSES

                                                               INTESTINAL DIALYSIS REVISITED

                     Kenneth Crompton, Dr. Delaney Sturgeon and Dr. David Burstein

        Intestinal dialysis has been described as the transfer of toxic substances from the blood system of the intestines to the decaying waste matter passing through the intestines and out of the body. This process is assisted by the presence of microorganisms and soluble fiber, in the gut.

    Studies have shown that this transfer of waste toxic products, in particular nitrogen compounds, may be assisted by adding a soluble fiber, like Acacia to the patients food intake. In the body, an equilibrium of uremic toxins normally exists between the blood and the intestinal lumen. In the normal patient, some nitrogenous wastes build up in the blood and start to diffuse into the intestinal fluid by natural physiological process. Microbes target and metabolize the wastes for nutrients and growth and begin to multiply, which consumes some of the nitrogen products and the equilibrium is disturbed, which allows more toxins to diffuse into the bowel and are metabolized by the microbes and then pass out of the body.

    In the diseased kidney, there are only two ways left for just a small amount of toxic nitrogen to be eliminated, the gut and the sweat glands, but this is not enough to sustain life and usually the patient receives routine dialysis sessions or, if lucky, a kidney transplant.

   This reported study was undertaken to enquire into the possibility of an alternative, or an adjunct to conventional dialysis procedures by using Gum Acacia and probiotics.

The following pages describe the actual techniques and products that were used, but should not be attempted without first consulting a Physician.

Kaptnken does not sell or endorse the products used in this study, but lists them as the products that used by him.


   Dr. Delany Sturgeon and Dr. David Burstein are practicing Nephologists at the Arizona Kidney Disease and Hypertention Clinics. Scottsdale, Arizona.

   Kenneth Crompton is a retired Medical Technologist with many years of experience in the medical and research field in several countries and has published several articles in Medical Journals.      Further history can be found on page 3.


 

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